Monday, October 22, 2007

Fixed Buffer Zone Abortion Perimeter Bill

The bill, scheduled for Senate debate Tuesday, would give Massachusetts among the strongest "fixed buffer zone" laws in the nation, creating a hard 35-foot perimeter around a [abortion] clinic's entrances and driveways.

"It's unfair. We're talking about a life-changing choice, and people who could give a woman material to assist her in that decision-making process are prohibited from doing it," [Massachusetts Citizens For Life Executive Director Marie Sturgis] said. - Source: Boston Globe

Needless to say, I agree with Sturgis 100%.

9 comments:

  1. Do abortion proponents force their way into prolife meetings to spread prochoice propoganda? Do they surround churches, giving out pamphlets about why abortion is okay? This is something I would be hard pressed to find.

    Women who chose to have an abortion choose to do so, well aware of the moral repurcussions. Prolife supporters are free to express their views (which I respect, but do not agree with) freely, but should not be allowed to harass women going into a clinic (who maybe are feeling bad enough already). I am a full supporter of free speech, and prolife proponents are free to express their opinions freely, but should not be able to intimidate a woman who has already made her decision.

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  2. You are a full supporter of free speech, yet protesting is a no-no?

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  3. Glen, you are in no position to call others hipocritical on the matter of free speech. ESPECIALLY in regards to protest.

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  4. Ali, I am not calling the poster a hypocrite. All I am asking is a question that I would like to be answered.

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  5. A woman who is going to have an abortion is either going to have it done, when she's already made her decision, or to get the opinion of a doctor who is trained in both physical and pychological medicine. People should not be standing outside of the building, harassing those who come in and out.

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  6. I'm a full supporter of free speech, yes. I also uphold the right to protest. Although, I do not support verbal harassment and intimidation, which, the majority of the time, are what go on outside of abortion clinics.

    But, just a side note, according to your article, protesting wasn't the topic of discussion, rather "[assisting] her in that decision-making process," whatever that is supposed to mean.

    I believe a woman has a right to abort a child because it is developing inside of her body. It just seems wrong to me to pass a law that forces a woman to remain pregnant, against her will. Unconstitutional, even?

    I can see where you're coming from, Glen. But, until you grow a uterus and ovaries, don't pass judgment on women who do not want to keep their child. But, maybe if the welfare system was a little more generous, the abortion rate would drop... tax raise anyone?

    I acknowledge the prolife views, disagree, but respect that the views of others can and will differ from my own. Such is life. At least it keeps things interesting. Imagine if we all agreed on everything...

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  7. Glen, how do you feel about abortion when the woman's and the baby's lives are in danger if she has to deliver the baby? Like, if a 13-year-old gets pregnant, but her body isn't developed enough to support a baby?

    Personally, I think abortion is something private that is the business of the mother, the father, and the abortion doctor. Keep the government out and keep random strangers who don't agree with someone's decision out. I'm sure women who get abortions are already stressed as it is without hundreds of strangers congregating outside of her hospital calling her a murderer.

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  8. i would really like to hear an answer to the comment above

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